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Colloquia This Term

ics Special Colloquium


Wednesday, January 16, 2019
3:30 PM
Physics Building, Room 204
Note special date.
Stephen Taylor [Host: Diana Vaman ]
California Institute of Technology
"Frontiers of Multi-Messenger Black-Hole Physics"
ABSTRACT:

The bounty of gravitational-wave observations from LIGO and Virgo has opened up a new window onto the warped Universe, as well as a pathway to addressing many of the contemporary challenges of fundamental physics. I will discuss how catalogs of stellar-mass compact object mergers can probe the unknown physical processes of binary stellar evolution, and how these systems can be harnessed as standard distance markers (calibrated entirely by fundamental physics) to map the expansion history of the cosmos. The next gravitational-wave frontier will be opened within 3-6 years by pulsar-timing arrays, which have unique access to black-holes at the billion to ten-billion solar mass scale. The accretionary dynamics of supermassive black-hole binaries should yield several tell-tale signatures observable in upcoming synoptic time-domain surveys, as well as gravitational-wave signatures measurable by pulsar timing. Additionally, pulsar-timing arrays are currently placing compelling constraints on modified gravity theories, cosmic strings, and ultralight scalar-field dark matter. I will review my work on these challenges, as well as in the exciting broader arena of gravitational-wave astrophysics, and describe my vision for the next decade of discovery. 

ics Special Colloquium


Thursday, January 17, 2019
3:30 PM
Physics Building, Room 204
Note special date.
Prem Kumar [Host: Bob Jones]
Northwestern University
"Quantum Engineering: A Transdisciplinary Vision"
ABSTRACT:

A global quantum revolution is currently underway based on the recognition that the subtler aspects of quantum physics known as superposition (wave-like aspect), measurement (particle-like aspect), and entanglement (inseparable link between the two aspects) are far from being merely intriguing curiosities, but can be transitioned into valuable, real-world technologies with performances that can far exceed those obtainable with classical technologies. The recent demonstration by the Chinese scientists of using a low-earth-orbit satellite to distribute entangled photons to two ground stations that are over a thousand kilometers apart is a stunning technological achievement—direct entanglement distribution over the best available fiber links is limited to a few hundred kilometers—and a harbinger of future possibilities for globally secure communications guaranteed by the power of quantum physics.

Harnessing the advantages enabled by superposition, measurement, and entanglement (SME)—the three pillars of quantum physics—for any given application is what is termed quantum engineering in general. In many instances, however, the details of the underlying science (high-temperature superconductivity, photosynthesis, avian navigation, are some examples) is still not fully understood, let alone how to turn the partially understood science into a potentially useful technology. Nevertheless, it has become clear in the last few decades that quantum engineering will require a truly concerted effort that will need to transcend the traditional disciplinary silos in order to create and sustain new breeds of science and technology communities that will be equally versed in quantum physics as they would be in their chosen area of technology. In this talk, I will present my vision for unleashing the potential of quantum engineering, taking some examples from ongoing and proposed research.

ics Colloquium
Friday, January 18, 2019
3:30 PM
Physics Building, Room 204
Markus Diefenthaler [Host: Simonetta Liuti]
Jefferson Lab
"The Electron Ion Collider Science "
ABSTRACT:

Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), the theory of the strong interaction, is a cornerstone of the Standard Model of modern physics. It explains all nuclear matter as bound states of point-like fermions, known as quarks, and gauge bosons, known as gluons. The gluons bind not only quarks but also interact with themselves. Unlike with the more familiar atomic and molecular matter, the interactions and structures are inextricably mixed up, and the observed properties of nucleons and nuclei, such as mass and spin, emerge out of this complex system. To precisely image the quarks and gluons and their interactions and to explore the new QCD frontier of strong color fields in nuclei, the Nuclear Physics community proposes an US-based Electron Ion collider (EIC) with high-energy and high-luminosity, capable of a versatile range of beam energies, polarizations, and ion species. The community is convinced that the EIC is the right tool to understand how matter at its most fundamental level is made.

ics Special Colloquium


Wednesday, January 23, 2019
3:30 PM
Physics Building, Room 204
Note special date.
Sarah Vigeland [Host: Diana Vaman]
University of Wisconsin Milwaukee
"Probing Massive and Supermassive Black Holes with Gravitational Waves"
ABSTRACT:

Observations have shown that nearly all galaxies harbor massive or supermassive black holes at their centers. Gravitational wave (GW) observations of these black holes will shed light on their growth and evolution, and the merger histories of galaxies. Massive and supermassive black holes are also ideal laboratories for studying strong-field gravity. Pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) are sensitive to GWs with frequencies ~1-100 nHz, and can detect GWs emitted by supermassive black hole binaries, which form when two galaxies merge. The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is a planned space-based GW detector that will be sensitive to GWs ~1-100 mHz, and it will see a variety of sources, including merging massive black hole binaries and extreme mass-ratio inspires (EMRIs), which consist of a small compact object falling into a massive black hole. I will discuss source modeling and detection techniques for LISA and PTAs, as well as present limits on nanohertz GWs from the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) collaboration.

 

ics Colloquium
Friday, January 25, 2019
3:30 PM
Physics Building, Room 204
Available
ics Special Colloquium


Wednesday, January 30, 2019
3:30 PM
Physics Building, Room 204
Note special date.
Jeremy Sakstein [Host: Diana Vaman]
University of Pennsylvania
"Testing Gravity with Cosmology and Astrophysics"
ABSTRACT:

We are entering a golden age of cosmology and astrophysics. In the coming decade we will have cosmological data for over a billion galaxies, a census of objects in the Milky Way, and a network of gravitational detectors spanning the globe that will detect thousands of events per year. This presents us with the unprecedented opportunity to learn how gravity behaves at the largest distances, and in the most extreme environments. In this talk I will describe how we can use current and upcoming data to understand the unexplained mysteries of the Universe, such as why the expansion of the Universe accelerating (dark energy). I will also discuss how to connect physics in these disparate regimes and how to test cosmology on small scales. To maximize the discovery potential of the data requires us to construct robust theoretical models, identify novel probes, and connect theory with observation, and I will describe projects where I have attempted to accomplish this. I will conclude the talk by discussing how this interdisciplinary effort will continue into the next decade and beyond.    

 

ics Colloquium
Friday, February 1, 2019
3:30 PM
Physics Building, Room 204
Reserved [Host: Diana Vaman]
ics Special Colloquium


Wednesday, February 6, 2019
3:30 PM
Physics Building, Room 204
Note special date.
Robert Penna [Host: Diana Vaman]
Columbia University
"Black Hole Bridges"
ABSTRACT:

Black holes are bridges between astrophysics and fundamental physics.  I will describe three examples of this theme.  First, I will explain how contemporary theoretical ideas deriving from the holographic principle have proven useful for interpreting numerical simulations of electromagnetic outflows from spinning black holes.  These models are currently being tested against X-ray and radio observations of galactic black holes.  Second, I will describe a correspondence between black holes and lower dimensional fluids and discuss the possibility of probing this correspondence with gravitational wave memory experiments.  Finally, I will describe how gravitational wave observations of black hole tidal interactions might be used to find new symmetries acting on the event horizon.

ics Colloquium
Friday, February 8, 2019
3:30 PM
Physics Building, Room 204
Reserved [Host: Diana Vaman]
ics Special Colloquium


Wednesday, February 13, 2019
3:30 PM
Physics Building, Room 204
Note special date.
Eliu Huerta [Host: Diana Vaman]
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
"Frontiers in Multi-Messenger Astrophysics at the interface of gravitational wave astrophysics, large scale astronomical surveys and data science "
ABSTRACT:

The next decade promises fundamental new scientific insights and discoveries from Multi-Messenger Astrophysics, enabled through the convergence of large scale astronomical surveys, gravitational wave astrophysics, deep learning and large scale computing. In this talk I describe a Multi-Messenger Astrophysics science program, and highlight recent accomplishments at the interface of gravitational wave astrophysics, numerical relativity and deep learning. I discuss the convergence of this program with large scale astronomical surveys in the context of gravitational wave cosmology. Future research and development activities are discussed, including a vision to leverage data science initiatives at the University of Virginia to spearhead, maximize and accelerate discovery in the nascent field of Multi-Messenger Astrophysics.

 

ics Colloquium
Friday, February 15, 2019
3:30 PM
Physics Building, Room 204
Reserved [Host: Diana Vaman]
ics Special Colloquium


Wednesday, February 20, 2019
3:30 PM
Physics Building, Room 204
Note special date.
David Nichols [Host: Diana Vaman]
University of Amsterdam
"Gravitational waves and fundamental properties of matter and spacetime"
ABSTRACT:

Gravitational waves from the mergers of ten binary black holes and one binary neutron star were detected in the first two observing runs by the Advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors. In this talk, I will discuss the eleven gravitational-wave detections and the electromagnetic observations that accompanied the neutron-star merger. These detections confirmed many of the predictions of general relativity, and they initiated the observational study of strongly curved, dynamical spacetimes and their highly luminous gravitational waves. One aspect of these high gravitational-wave luminosities that LIGO and Virgo will be able to measure is the gravitational-wave memory effect: a lasting change in the gravitational-wave strain produced by energy radiated in gravitational waves. I will describe how this effect is related to symmetries and conserved quantities of spacetime, how the memory effect can be measured with LIGO and Virgo, and how new types of memory effects have been recently predicted. I will conclude by discussing the plans for the next generation of gravitational-wave detectors after LIGO and Virgo and the scientific capabilities of these new detectors. These facilities could detect millions of black-hole and neutron-star mergers per year, and they can provide insights on a range of topics from the population of short gamma-ray bursts to the presence of dark matter around black holes.

 

ics Colloquium
Friday, February 22, 2019
3:30 PM
Physics Building, Room 204
Reserved [Host: Diana Vaman]
ics Colloquium
Friday, March 1, 2019
3:30 PM
Physics Building, Room 204
Genya Kolomeisky [Host: Israel Klich]
University of Virginia - Physics
"Kelvin-Froude wake patterns of a traveling pressure disturbance"
ABSTRACT:

Water wave patterns behind ships fuel human curiosity because they are both beautiful and easily observed.  These patterns called wakes were famously described in 1887 by Lord Kelvin.  According to Kelvin, the feather-like appearance of the wake is universal and the entire wake is confined within a 39 degree angle.  While such wakes have been observed, deviations from Kelvin’s predictions have also been reported.  In this talk summarizing my work with UVA alumnus Jonathan Colen I will present a quantitative reasoning based on classical surface water wave theory that explains why some wakes are similar to Kelvin’s prediction, and why others are less so.  The central result is a classification of wake patterns which all can be understood in terms of the problem originally treated by Kelvin.

ics Colloquium
Friday, March 8, 2019
3:30 PM
Physics Building, Room 204

"Available"
ics Colloquium
Friday, March 22, 2019
3:30 PM
Physics Building, Room 204
Jim Gates [Host: Diana Vaman]
Brown University
"TBA"
ics Colloquium
Friday, March 29, 2019
3:30 PM
Physics Building, Room 204
Dr. Ho Nyung Lee [Host: Seunghun Lee]
ORNL
"TBA"
ics Colloquium
Friday, April 5, 2019
3:30 PM
Physics Building, Room 204
Steve Nagler [Host: Bellave Shivaram]
Oak Ridge National Lab
"TBA"
ics Colloquium
Friday, April 12, 2019
3:30 PM
Physics Building, Room 204
Dr. Vivek Goyal [Host: MIller Eaton]
Boston University
"TBA"
ics Colloquium
Friday, April 19, 2019
3:30 PM
Physics Building, Room 204
Dr. Craig D. Roberts [Host: Nilanga Liyanage]
Argonne National Laboratory
"TBA"
ics Joint Colloquium with Physics and Astronomy/NRAO


Friday, April 26, 2019
3:30 PM
Physics Building, Room 204
Andrew Steiner [Host: Kent Yagi]
University of Tennessee
"TBA"
Colloquia and Special Lectures Committee
Cass Sackett (Chair)
Bob Hirosky (Member)
Israel Klich (Member)
Seunghun Lee (Member)
Simonetta Liuti (Member)
Marija Vucelja (Member)
Nilanga Liyanage (Ex-Officio)

To add a speaker, send an email to cas8m@Virginia.EDU Include the seminar type (e.g. Colloquia), date, name of the speaker, title of talk, and an abstract (if available). [Please send a copy of the email to phys-speakers@Virginia.EDU.]