Seminars And Colloquia SEARCH:Hoxton

ics Special Colloquium and Hoxton Lecture


Thursday, September 21, 2017
7:00 PM
Chemistry Building, Room 402
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Nergis Mavalvala
M.I.T.
"The Warped Universe: the one hundred year quest to discover Einstein’s gravitational waves"
ABSTRACT:

In 2016, scientists announced the first ever detection of gravitational waves from colliding black holes, launching a new era of gravitational wave astrophysics. Gravitational waves were predicted by Einstein a hundred years earlier. I will describe the science, technology, and human story behind these discoveries that provide a window into some of the most violent and warped events in the Universe.

 

ics Special Colloquium: Hoxton Lecture


Thursday, April 14, 2016
7:00 PM
Chemistry Building, Room 402
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Sidney R. Nagel [Host: Seunghun Lee]
University of Chicago
"Impact and Intrusion: the surprises and elegance of how nature arranges the texture of our lives"
 
 Slideshow (PDF)
ABSTRACT:

Many complex phenomena are so familiar that we hardly realize that they defy our normal intuition.  Examples include the anomalous flow of granular material, the long messy tendrils left by honey spooned from one dish to another, the pesky rings deposited by spilled coffee on a table after the liquid evaporates or the common splash of a drop of liquid onto a countertop.  Aside from being uncommonly beautiful to see, many of these phenomena involve non-linear behavior where the system is far from equilibrium.  Although most of the world we know is beyond description by equilibrium theories, we are still only at the threshold of learning how to deal with such deep and complex behavior.  Thus, these are phenomena that can lead the inquisitive into new realms of physics.

SLIDESHOW:
ics Special Colloquium: Hoxton Lecture


Wednesday, April 15, 2015
7:00 PM
Chemistry Building, Room Chemistry Building, Room 402
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Alan Guth [Host: Brad Cox]
MIT
"Inflationary Cosmology: Is Our Universe Part of a Multiverse?"
 
 Slideshow (PDF)
ABSTRACT:

Inflationary cosmology gives a plausible explanation for many observed features of the universe, including its uniformity, its mass density, and the patterns of the ripples that are observed in the cosmic microwave background. Beyond what we can observe, most versions of inflation imply that our universe is not unique, but is part of a possibly infinite multiverse. I will describe the workings of inflation, the evidence for inflation, and why I believe that the possibility of a multiverse should be taken seriously.

SLIDESHOW:
ics Hoxton Lecture


Thursday, March 27, 2014
7:00 PM
Chemistry 402, Room 402
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H. Jeff Kimble [Host: Brad Cox]
Caltech
"Quantum Networks in Quantum Optics"
ABSTRACT:

This talk will discuss the opportunities for the exploration of physical systems that have not heretofore existed in the natural world.

ics Hoxton Lecture


Thursday, April 18, 2013
7:00 PM
Chemistry Building, Room Chemistry 402
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Chris Quigg [Host: Brad Cox]
Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory
"The World According to Higgs"
ABSTRACT:

New developments in particle physics offer a new and radically simple conception of the universe. Fundamental particles called quarks and leptons make up everyday matter, and two new laws of nature rule their interactions. Until July 4, 2012, our neat story was missing one piece, a particle called the Higgs boson. Without it, there would be no atoms, no chemistry, no liquids or solids, and no basis for life. Why did thousands of physicists devote decades to the hunt, and how does the “discovery of the century” change the way we see the world?

ics Special Colloquium: Hoxton Lecture


Thursday, April 12, 2012
7:00 PM
Chemistry Building, Room 402
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Edward Moses [Host: Brad Cox]
National Ignition Facility
"The National Ignition Facility: Pathway to Energy Security and Physics of the Cosmos"
ABSTRACT:

The National Ignition Facility (NIF), at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California, is the world’s most energetic laser system. NIF is capable of producing over 1.8 MJ and 500 TW of ultraviolet light, 100 times more than any other operating laser. Completed in March 2009, it is maturing rapidly and transitioning into the world’s premier high-energy-density science experimental facility, while supporting its strategic security, fundamental science, and energy security missions.

By concentrating intense laser energy into target only millimeters in length, NIF can, for the first time, produce conditions emulating those found in planetary interiors and stellar environments and creating fusion energy to power our future. The extreme conditions of energy density, pressure, and temperature will enable scientists to pursue fundamental science experiments designed to address a range of scientific questions, from observing new states of matter to exploring the origin of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays. Early experiments have been successfully completed in support of materials equations of state, materials strength, and radiation transport in extreme temperature and pressure conditions.

The National Ignition Campaign, an international effort pursued on the NIF, aims to demonstrate fusion burn and generate more energy output than the laser energy delivered to the target. Achieving this ignition goal will validate the viability of inertial fusion energy (IFE) as a clean source of energy. A laser-based IFE power plant will require advances in high-repetition-rate lasers, large-scale target fabrication, target injection and tracking, and other supporting technologies. These capabilities could lead to an operational prototype IFE power plant in 10 to 15 years. LLNL, in partnership with academia, national laboratories, and industry, is developing a Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) baseline design concept and examining technology choices for developing a LIFE prototype power plant.

This talk will describe the unprecedented experimental capabilities of the NIF, its role in strategic security and fundamental science, and the pathway to achieving fusion ignition to create a clean and secure energy future.

ics Hoxton Lecture


Thursday, April 7, 2011
7:00 PM
Chemistry , Room 402
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Burton Richter [Host: Brad Cox]
Stanford University
"Beyond Smoke and Mirrors: Climate Change and Energy in the 21st Century"
 
 Slideshow (PDF)
ABSTRACT:

Professor Richter is the co-winner of the 1976 Nobel Prize in physics for the discovery of the J/Ψ particle which was the first observation of a particle containing a fourth quark named the charm quark and was a central part of the so-called November revolution of particle physics. He has accumulated many other honors in his career including a long tenure as the director of Stanford Linear Acceleratory Laboratory from 1984 to 1999. He has also been the recipient of the E.O. Lawrence Medal, has served as president of the American Physical Society, and is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. He presently serves on the board of directors of Scientists and Engineers for America, an organization focused on promoting sound science in American government and is a Senior Fellow by Courtesy of the Center for Environmental Science and Policy at Stanford Institute for International Studies. In the past several years Professor Richter has turned his attention to the central problem of the 21st century, the effect of human activity on the global climate. He has written a book with the same title as his lecture.

SLIDESHOW:
ics Hoxton Lecture
Thursday, April 17, 2008
7:30 PM
Physics Building, Room Chemistry Building, Room 402
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Alan Watson [Host: Physics Department]
University of Leeds, United Kingdom
"The Birth of Cosmic Ray Astronomy on the Argentine Pampas"
ics Hoxton Lecture
Thursday, March 22, 2007
7:30 PM
Chemistry Building, Room 402
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John Mather [Host: Brad Cox]
Goddard Space Center
"From the Big Bang to the Nobel Prize"
ABSTRACT:
The history of the universe in a nutshell, from the Big Bang to now, and on to the future – John Mather will tell the story of how we got here, how the Universe began with a Big Bang, how it could have produced an Earth where sentient beings can live, and how those beings are discovering their history. Mather was Project Scientist for NASA’s Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite, which measured the spectrum (the color) of the heat radiation from the Big Bang, discovered hot and cold spots in that radiation, and hunted for the first objects that formed after the great explosion. He will explain Einstein’s biggest mistake, show how Edwin Hubble discovered the expansion of the universe, how the COBE mission was built, and how the COBE data support the Big Bang theory. He will also show NASA’s plans for the next great telescope in space, the James Webb Space Telescope. It will look even farther back in time than the Hubble Space Telescope, and will look inside the dusty cocoons where stars and planets are being born today. Planned for launch in 2013, it may lead to another Nobel prize for some lucky observer.
ics Hoxton Lecture


Tuesday, April 19, 2005
7:30 PM
Chemistry Building Auditorium, Room 402
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Saul Perlmutter [Host: Brad Cox]
University of California - Berkeley
"Supernovae, Dark Energy, and the Accelerating Universe"
ABSTRACT:

This constant acted as a sort of anti-gravity to counteract the force of gravity that would otherwise be pulling the masses of the universe together. When astronomers such as Hubble and others subsequently observed the red shifts of far distant stars and galaxies, they discovered that the universe is not static but, indeed, is expanding. Therefore, it no longer seemed necessary to have a counter balance to gravity. It is said that Einstein, when he heard of the expansion of the universe, characterized his use of a cosmological constant his greatest mistake. Indeed, for the better part of 100 years the standard view of the universe was that its expansion rate was gradually slowing down under the influence of the gravity of its components. The question of the future of the universe was posed in terms of, depending on the total mass of the universe, whether the universe would come to a stop and fall back in on itself, come to a halt at infinite time, or continue to expand forever. Professor Perlmutter and his colleagues, using Supernovas Type Ia as “standard candles” because of their great brightness, have measured the expansion rate of the universe at much large distances than previously possible. In doing so, they have made the remarkable discovery that the expansion of the universe is actually accelerating. There appears to be a previously undetected force of nature that acts like antigravity, dominating the gravitational force and causing the universe to expand faster and faster with time. So the better part of a century after the cosmological constant was abandoned, it seems that it must be re-employed to describe this new phenomenon which has been labeled dark energy. Perhaps Einstein was right after all!

ics 34th Annual Hoxton Lecture
Monday, February 9, 2004
7:00 PM
Physics Building, Room 203
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Professor Theodor Hansch [Host: Department of Physics]
Director of Max Panck Institute
"Ultra-Precise Laser Spectroscopy: Counting the Ripples of a Light Wave"
ics The Llewellyn G. Hoxton Lecture Please not time and place


Monday, October 29, 2001
7:30 PM
Chemistry Building , Room 402
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Gerald 't Hooft [Host: Department of Physics]
University of Utrecht
"The Universe of the Elementary Particles"
ics 31st Annual Llewellyn G. Hoxton Lecture


Thursday, April 26, 2001
7:30 PM
Chemistry Building, Room Chemistry Auditorium
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Justin Rattner
Intel Fellow and Director of Intel's Microprocessor Research Lab
"Electronics in the Internet Age"

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