Future Seminars And Colloquia

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Monday, October 25, 2021
9:00 AM
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"Single-site and single-atom imaging of Lithium-7 atoms in an optical lattice."


Dr. Jae-yoon Choi , KAIST South Korea
[Host: Peter Schauss]
ABSTRACT:

Imaging and addressing individual atoms in optical lattices with single-site resolution constitute a new approach to the study of quantum many-body problems. It provides microscopic information of quantum many-body states, such as correlation functions, and one can engineer arbitrary density patterns for the study of non-equilibrium quantum dynamics. Here, we report the first realization of the quantum gas microscope of Lithium-7 atoms in a square two-dimensional optical lattice and observation of the unity filling Mott insulator with few thousand atoms. We implement the Raman sideband cooling in the lattice and about 4,000 photons per atom are detected by high numerical aperture (NA=0.65) objective lens. The point spread function (PSF) of the imaging system is measured to be 630 nm (full width half maximum), small enough to resolve the lattice spacing (752 nm). In the talk, we will also introduce our journey (both successful and failed stories) when implementing the state-of-the-art imaging system.

High Energy
Wednesday, October 27, 2021
4:00 PM
Physics Building, Room 204

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"Status and Prospects for the NOvA Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment "


Erika Catano-Mur , William and Mary
[Host: Craig Group]
ABSTRACT:

Neutrino oscillations are transitions in flight between the different neutrino flavors that arise from the non-degenerate neutrino masses and lepton mixing. These transitions are evidenced in solar, atmospheric, reactor and accelerator experiments. Current experimental efforts seek to improve the precision measurements of the elements of the mixing matrix, to determine the order of the neutrino masses, and to search for evidence of neutrino/antineutrino asymmetry in oscillation probabilities.

NOvA is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment, which consists of two finely segmented liquid-scintillator detectors operating 14.6 mrad off-axis from Fermilab’s NuMI muon neutrino (or antineutrino) beam. With an 810 km baseline, the measurements of muon neutrino disappearance and electron neutrino appearance allow the determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy, the octant of the largest neutrino mixing angle, and charge-parity (CP) violation in the neutrino sector. In this talk, I summarize NOvA’s most recent 3-flavor oscillation results, based on the combined analysis of neutrino and antineutrino datasets with an exposure of ~13×1020 protons-on-target in each beam mode. I also discuss the experiment’s projected sensitivities, and the potential of discovery with current and next-generation long-baseline experiments.

Condensed Matter
Thursday, October 28, 2021
3:30 PM
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"Triangular Gross-Pitaevskii breathers and Damski-Chandrasekhar shock waves"


Professor Maxim Olchanyi , University of Massachusetts Boston
[Host: Prof. Israel Klich]
ABSTRACT:

The recently proposed map [arXiv:2011.01415] between the hydrodynamic equations governing the two-dimensional triangular cold-bosonic breathers [Phys. Rev. X 9, 021035 (2019)] and the high-density zero-temperature triangular free-fermionic clouds, both trapped harmonically, perfectly explains the former phenomenon but leaves uninterpreted the nature of the initial (t=0) singularity. This singularity is a density discontinuity that leads, in the bosonic case, to an infinite force at the cloud edge. The map itself becomes invalid at time t=T/4. Here, we first map -- using the scale invariance of the problem -- the trapped motion to an untrapped one. Then we show that in the new representation, the solution [arXiv:2011.01415] becomes, along a ray in the direction normal to one of the three edges of the initial cloud, a freely propagating one-dimensional shock wave of a class proposed by Damski in [Phys. Rev. A 69, 043610 (2004)]. There, for a broad class of initial conditions, the one-dimensional hydrodynamic equations can be mapped to the inviscid Burgers' equation, a nonlinear transport equation. More specifically, under the Damski map, the t=0 singularity of the original problem becomes, verbatim, the initial condition for the wave catastrophe solution found by Chandrasekhar in 1943 [Ballistic Research Laboratory Report No. 423 (1943)]. At t=T/8, our interpretation ceases to exist: at this instance, all three effectively one-dimensional shock waves emanating from each of the three sides of the initial triangle collide at the origin, and the 2D-1D correspondence between the solution of [arXiv:2011.01415] and the Damski-Chandrasekhar shock wave becomes invalid.

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Friday, October 29, 2021
3:30 PM
Physics Building, Room 204

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"Exploring Gravitational Wave and Dark Matter Physics with the 100-meter-tall MAGIS-100 Atom Interferometer"


Professor Tim Kovachy , Northwestern University
[Host: Prof. Bob Hirosky]
ABSTRACT:

Atom interferometers exploit spatially delocalized quantum states to make a wide variety of highly precise measurements.  Recent technological advances have opened a path for atom interferometers to contribute to multiple areas at the forefront of modern physics, including searches for wave-like dark matter, gravitational wave detection, and fundamental quantum science.  In this colloquium, I will describe MAGIS-100, a 100-meter-tall atom interferometer being built at Fermilab to pursue these directions.  MAGIS-100 will serve as a prototype gravitational wave detector in a new frequency range, between the peak sensitivities of LIGO and LISA, that is promising for pursuing cosmological signals from the early universe and for studying a broad range of astrophysical sources.  In addition, MAGIS-100 will search for wave-like dark matter, probe quantum mechanics in a new regime in which massive particles are delocalized over macroscopic scales in distance and time, and act as a testbed for advanced quantum sensing techniques.  Finally, I will discuss the potential and motivation for follow-on atomic detectors with even longer baselines.

 

Condensed Matter
Wednesday, November 3, 2021
3:30 PM
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"TBA"


Chaitali Ghosh , Caltech
[Host: Utpal Chatterjee]
ABSTRACT:

TBA

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Wednesday, November 3, 2021
4:00 PM
Physics Building, Room 204

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"TBA"


Prof. Tracy Larson , UVA Biology
[Host: Chris Neu]
ABSTRACT:

TBA

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Friday, November 5, 2021
3:30 PM
Physics Building, Room 204

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"Atomtronics for Quantum Sensing"


Malcolm Boshier , Los Alamos National Lab
[Host: Professor Cass Sackett]
ABSTRACT:

TBA

Gravity
Monday, November 8, 2021
1:00 PM
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Leah Jenks , Brown University
[Host: Kent Yagi]
ABSTRACT:

TBA

Condensed Matter
Thursday, November 11, 2021
3:30 PM
Physics Building, Room 204

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"Quantum spin Hall effect in monolayer WTe2"


Wenjin Zhao , Cornell University
[Host: Prof. Dima Pesin]
ABSTRACT:

WTe2 is an example of a two-dimensional semimetal. It shows incredibly diverse and intriguing behavior such as the quantum spin Hall effect (QSH), superconductivity, ferroelectricity, and excitonic insulator, providing a new platform for studying the interplay between topology and correlations. In this talk I will discuss the helical nature of the QSH edge state in monolayer WTe2 and the proximity effect of a magnet upon it. In the first part, I will describe how we explore the spin-momentum locking in the QSH edge state and determine the spin axis by studying the magnetic anisotropy. In the second part, I will discuss the magnetic coupling between a two-dimensional antiferromagnet, CrI3, and the QSH edge state.

 

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Friday, November 12, 2021
3:30 PM
Physics Building, Room 204

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"Physics motivations for future colliders"


Tao Han , University of Pittsburg
[Host: Professor P.Q. Hung]
ABSTRACT:

With the milestone discovery of the Higgs boson at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), high energy physics has entered a new era. The completion of the “Standard Model” (SM) implies, for the first time ever, that we have a relativistic, quantum-mechanical, self-consistent theoretical framework, conceivably valid up to exponentially high energies, even to the Planck scale. Yet, the SM leaves many unanswered questions both from the theoretical and observational perspectives, including the nature of the electroweak superconductivity and its phase transition, the hierarchy between the particle masses and between the observed scales, the nature of dark matter etc. There are thus compelling reasons to believe that new physics beyond the SM exists. We argue that the collective efforts of future high energy physics programs, in particular the future colliders, hold great promise to uncover the laws of nature to a deeper level. 

Condensed Matter
Thursday, November 18, 2021
3:30 PM
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Yinyu Liu , Harvard
[Host: Utpal Chatterjee]
ABSTRACT:

TBA

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Friday, November 19, 2021
3:30 PM
Physics Building, Room 204

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"Analogue gravity in cold atom and condensed matter systems "


Dan Sheehy , Louisiana State University
[Host: Cass Sackett]
ABSTRACT:

In recent years there has been much interest in the field of "analogue gravity", in which cosmological or astrophysical phenomena like Hawking radiation are mimicked in a laboratory experiment.  At LSU, my research group in cold atom/condensed matter theory became interested in this field, motivated by the recent experiment of Eckel and collaborators, [Phys. Rev. X 8, 021021 (2018)] who used a rapidly expanding Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) to reproduce the inflationary regime of the early universe.  I will present our work on the physics of inflation in expanding BEC's, and discuss other setups to detect analogue gravity phenomena like the Unruh effect.  

Condensed Matter
Thursday, December 2, 2021
3:30 PM
Physics Building, Room 204

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Thomas Barthel , Duke University
[Host: Israel Klich ]
ABSTRACT:

TBA

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Friday, December 3, 2021
3:30 PM
Physics Building, Room TBA
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Ian Spielman , Joint Quantum Institute
[Host: Prof. Dima Pesin]
ABSTRACT:

TBA

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Meeting ID: 922 8790 9487
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Wednesday, December 8, 2021
4:00 PM
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Dr. Christine McClean , SUNY-Buffalo
[Host: Chris Neu]
ABSTRACT:

TBA

Condensed Matter
Thursday, December 9, 2021
3:30 PM
Physics Building, Room via Zoom
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Anaëlle Legros , John Hopkins University
[Host: Utpal Chatterjee]
ABSTRACT:

TBA

Condensed Matter
Thursday, December 16, 2021
3:30 PM
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Kayla Nguyễn , UIUC
[Host: Utpal Chatterjee]
ABSTRACT:

TBA

Colloquium
Friday, January 21, 2022
3:30 PM
Physics Building, Room 204

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David Nichols , University of Virginia - Department of Physics
[Host: Professor Despina Louca]
ABSTRACT:

TBA

Colloquium
Friday, January 28, 2022
3:30 PM
Physics Building, Room 204

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Professor Lloyd Knox , UC Davis
[Host: Prof. Genya Kolomeisky]
ABSTRACT:

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To add a speaker, send an email to phys-speakers@Virginia.EDU. Please include the seminar type (e.g. Seminars and Colloquia), date, name of the speaker, title of talk, and an abstract (if available).